Treatment

Healing House Packedd Community Center

Pandemic Poses Unique Challenges For Treatment Facilities


Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, COMBAT-funded treatment agencies are continuing to serve their clients the best they can under difficult circumstances. The global public health crisis poses unique challenges for all these agencies, but especially those operating residential facilities or recovery houses—places where practicing “social distancing” isn’t necessarily easy and runs counter to addressing the social isolation many people with a substance use disorder (SUD) can feel.
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“COMBAT Saved My Life”

How much does drug abuse cost us? 

"Us" as a society?

"Us," as in the United States?

$200 Billion



The National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates the societal price tag of drug abuse in American is about $200 billion per year. Expenses associated with the criminal justice system—court costs, incarceration, etc.—account for more than half that amount. Less than 10% of that $200 billion is related to treating substance use disorders (SUD).  

"Treatment is cost effective in reducing drug use and bringing about related savings in health care," the National Institute of Health (NIH) concluded. "Treatment also consistently has been shown to reduce the costs associated with lost productivity, crime and incarceration across various settings and populations. The largest economic benefit of treatment is seen in avoided costs of crime."

Simply put: It is more cost effective to treat people with a SUD than it is to incarcerate them. 

Legal Issue & Public Health Crisis



As we've stated many times before, COMBAT addresses drug abuse as both a legal issue and public health crisis. Therefore, COMBAT funds law enforcement efforts like the Jackson County Drug Task Force, which targets drug traffickers; diversion programs like the Jackson County Drug Court, which allows non-violent offenders an alternative to traditional criminal prosecution; and treatment programs offered by outside agencies.

How impactful has this funding been?

  • The Drug Task Force seized a record $30.4 million in illegal drugs in 2019, including 297 pounds of methamphetamine valued at more than $25 million. » MORE
  • Upon completing the Drug Court program, 100% of graduates are employed full-time or enrolled as students full-time. After graduation, 96% remain conviction free. » MORE
  • Since 2015* COMBAT-funded treatment programs had provided services to more than 13,000 unique clients.
Among those clients was Tommy McGee. He has remained sober since undergoing treatment at a COMBAT-funded agency in 2015, and he doesn’t mince words when he says, “COMBAT saved my life.” 

Today, Tommy works as a Certified Peer Specialist who works for CommCare’s EPICC program. He goes into emergency rooms to let people who’ve survived an opioid overdose know what treatment options are available to them. 

“If I hadn’t gotten that treatment [paid for by COMBAT], today I’d either be back in prison or dead,” Tommy states.

“COMBAT didn’t just save my life; it gave me a chance to change my life for the better. I am grateful for that, so I’m going to keep on working on being a better person, helping others and staying on the right path."

I'd Be Back In Prison Or Dead


COMBAT Saved My LifeI'm convinced that I would be back in prison or dead, if I had not gotten drug treatment through a COMBAT-funded program in 2015. Now today I am working to help others start their recovery journeys. The "mess" I had made out of my life can now be a "message" for someone else going through addiction. I want to give them hope, let them know if a guy like me can get clean and stay clean, they can too.
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2020 COMBAT-Funded Treatment Programs



» Drug Counseling Programs   

  • Cornerstones Substance-use Treatment Program
  • Crittenton Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program 
  • Footprints Recovery Support Services 
  • Guadalupe Center's Outpatient Treatment Program 
  • Hope House Supported Recovery Program 
  • LS Treatment Services/Women & Children's Program 
  • Plaza Academy Treatment For At-Risk Adolescents 
  • Rose Brooks Supported Recovery Program 
» Intensive Outpatient Treatment   

  • Benilde Hall Program
  • Children's Mercy TIES
  • Crittenton Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program
  • LS Treatment Services/Women & Children's Program
  • Mattie Rhodes Nuevo Amanecer (New Dawn)
  • Sheffield Place
» Partial Hospitalization Treatment  

  • CMHS Substance Use Disorder Program
  • LS Treatment Services/Women & Children's Program 
» Recovery Houses

  • Amethyst Supportive Housing
  • Footprints Recovery Support Services
  • Healing House
  • Sheffield Place
  • Sisters In Christ Recovery Houses
  • Welcome House Sober Living Recovery Program
» Residential Inpatient

  • CMHS Substance Use Disorder Program
  • LS Treatment Services/Women & Children's Program


 OTHER TREATMENT OPTIONS

In addition to the programs for treating Substance Use Disorders listed on this page, COMBAT also funds multiple Violence Prevention programs that offer counseling and others services for victims of violent crime, including Project Rise at Truman Medical Center.

» Violence Prevention Programs

CONTACT US

  1. Jackson County Courthouse
    415 E. 12th Street
    9th Floor

    816-881-1410

    Director
    Vince Ortega

    » Staff Directory
    » COMBAT Commission
    » Crime Tips & Hotlines
    » Emergency Dial 9-1-1

    Hours
    Monday-Friday
    8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.