Criminal Justice

COMBAT has played a vital role in law enforcement's ability to confront drug production and trafficking, as well as other drug-related crimes. COMBAT helps fund the Jackson County Drug Task Force, a multi-jurisdictional agency that helps smaller police agencies more successfully fight drug crime in their communities, and it funds both the COMBAT funds both the Drug Unit and the Community Justice Unit, 2 special programs in the Jackson County Prosecutor's office dedicated to prosecuting offenses in which the use of illegal narcotics contributed to the commitment of a crime.
Members of the Jackson County Drug Task Force conduct drills
Innovation in Enforcement
Furthermore, in its approach to dealing with non-violent drug offenders, Jackson County has become a leading innovator in the nation through the COMBAT-supported Drug Court. The best treatment outcomes are derived under court supervision. The Jackson County Drug Court diverts nonviolent offenders into court-supervised treatment in lieu of incarceration. More than 1,000 Drug Court "graduates" have turned their lives around through this program.

These are just a few of the law enforcement success stories made possible through COMBAT funding:
  • Since 1997, the Jackson County Drug Task Force has investigated more than 1,000 state and federal cases that have resulted in felony convictions.
  • The multi-jurisdictional Jackson County Drug Task Force and the Kansas City Police Department's Street Narcotics and Drug Enforcement Units have seized and recovered more than $300 million worth of controlled substances from Jackson County communities.
  • COMBAT funds 50 correctional officers at the Jackson County Detention Center, which increases the facility's capacity by 200 inmates.
  • More than 60 detectives and law enforcement positions throughout the County are funded by COMBAT.
  • Since 1991, the Drug Abatement Response Team (DART) has stopped drug activity at more than 7,200 Jackson County properties.
  • Five years after graduation, 96% of Drug Court graduates remain conviction free.